Cryptocurrency Tax Advisor
Cryptocurrency Tax Advisor

Cryptocurrency Tax Advisor (29)

Crypto investors and traders have been plagued by regulatory uncertainty in India. As the Indian Government authorities continue to struggle in fundamentally differentiating. Bitcoin from Blockchain, the subcontinent's economy is positioned to lose out on, what is possibly, the century's biggest revolution. Having added to the fear, uncertainty and doubt, is the ring-fencing notification issued by the RBI, restricting banking access to Indian crypto exchanges. Despite the speed-bump, believers of the Blockchain technology remain undeterred, thanks to which trading volumes have picked up on the Indian exchanges. Although there isn’t any clarity in tax legislation, the Indian Revenue Authorities are breathing down the necks of crypto traders. It is, therefore, imperative to accurately compute and report any income from cryptocurrencies. Consult a top-notch Cryptocurrency CA to get clarity on myriad of accounting and tax issues arising from Cryptocurrency Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for information purposes only and do not constitute an advice or a legal opinion and are personal views of the author. It is based upon relevant law and/or facts available at that point of time and prepared with due accuracy & reliability. Readers are requested to check and refer relevant provisions of statute, latest judicial pronouncements, circulars, clarifications etc before acting on the basis of the above write up.  The possibility of other views on the subject matter cannot be ruled out. By the use of the said information, you agree that we are not responsible or liable in any manner for the authenticity, accuracy, completeness, errors or any kind of omissions in this piece of information for any action taken thereof. CA Mitesh and Associates is Mumbai's leading Cryptocurrency Taxation Firm which is committed to helping people navigate complex tax laws and banking regulations. Our main aim is to assist the individuals with applicable laws & regulations compliance and providing support at each & every level to make sure that they stay compliant and grow continuously. For any query, help or feedback you may get in touch here - Appointment with CA

How To Pay Tax On Cryptocurrency In India

Tax On Cryptocurrency In India

How To Pay Tax On Cryptocurrency In India

In this article, we shall focus on Crypto traders dilemma as to How To Pay Tax On Cryptocurrency In India. First, a little about us - We are the leading crypto tax consultants in India. We handle all your Income Tax compliances for any incomes arising on any Blockchain or cryptocurrency trading. So while you invest, trade, mine, run nodes or offer Blockchain solutions, we are happy to take care of your crypto taxes for you.

Ok, now back to main topic, Under Indian tax laws, the nature of virtual currency investments is unclear. What is certain is there’s no escaping taxes. Notices have reportedly been served to about 500,000 investors for non-payment of taxes. In the past few months, crypto exchanges, too, have appeared on the Reserve Bank of India’ and the government’s radar. The RBI has forbidden banks from dealing with these exchanges and investors in any fashion, while a panel formed by the Narendra Modi government is working on draft regulations for digital currencies. In such volatile times, We have urging our clients to not skip paying taxes.

As the deadline for filing I-T returns approaches, here’s a look at what investors could do.

 

Tax On Cryptocurrency for Individual investors

As the tax treatment of  cryptocurrency continues to be in the grey zone, it is open to interpretation.

In case of gains, you have to state profits or capital gains made by you from transaction in cryptocurrencies year-wise with statements showing the workings says the tax notice sent by the I-T department to investors in the last few months. As a result, most chartered CAs including us are inclined to treat these investments as capital gains tax.

The premise of capital gains is that an investment will be held for a certain period of time so that its value appreciates. These taxes are divided into ****short-term and long-term.

For most investments such as equities, jewellery, land, debt funds, etc. the time period is specified, according to which an item may be taxed under short-term or long-term gains. However, since it is not specified, we are going to assume and take the longer time-frame of three years, and only after holding the investment for three years it will be called long-term gains.

In case of a short-term gain, the amount is added to the income and taxed according to the tax slab that an individual falls under. For instance, anyone who earns over Rs10 lakh ($14,614) will be taxed at 30%.

If it falls under the long-term category, it will be taxed at 20%. The tax rate can go down further once indexation benefit is applied, which allows one to adjust for inflation during the period these investments were held. Every year, the Central Board of Direct Taxes releases the cost inflation on which these assessments are done.

However, since details of the tax treatment are unclear, We suggests a safer alternative is to report it as income from other sources. In this case, the amount gets added to the salary or business income and then taxes are paid on it as per the slab under which an individual falls.

 

Tax On Cryptocurrency for traders

For a trader, earnings from virtual currencies are treated as income from business. Under this, certain expenses related to business, office maintenance, such as buying a computer, internet expenses, office rent, administration cost, etc., can be deducted. Then, on the remaining amount, tax will be applicable as per the slab.

If you are a trader and your turnover crosses the Rs 2 crore mark, you need to go for a tax audit by a chartered accountant.

Another key issue is choosing the right form to file returns. Depending on whether an individual is treating it as capital gains or income from other sources or business, ITR2 or ITR3 must be picked.

DISCLAIMER

The contents of this article are for information purposes only and do not constitute an advice or a legal opinion and are personal views of the author. It is based upon relevant law and/or facts available at that point of time and prepared with due accuracy & reliability. Readers are requested to check and refer relevant provisions of statute, latest judicial pronouncements, circulars, clarifications etc before acting on the basis of the above write up.  The possibility of other views on the subject matter cannot be ruled out. By the use of the said information, you agree that we are not responsible or liable in any manner for the authenticity, accuracy, completeness, errors or any kind of omissions in this piece of information for any action taken thereof. CA Mitesh and Associates is India's leading Cryptocurrency Taxation Firm which is committed to helping people navigate complex tax laws and banking regulations. Our main aim is to assist the individuals with applicable laws & regulations compliance and providing support at each & every level to make sure that they stay compliant and grow continuously. For any query, help or feedback you may get in touch here - Appointment with CA. Please note the all consultations with the CA are Paid consultations.

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India Cryptocurrency Taxation

Cryptocurrency Taxation in India

While India Cryptocurrency Taxation scene is still evolving, in this post I will cover how the cryptocurrency might be taxed in India.

India Cryptocurrency Taxation under Direct Tax Regime

The treatment of cryptocurrencies under the direct tax regime is mainly governed by the Income Tax Act in India. In the current legal landscape, there is no certainty regarding the taxation of cryptocurrency nor any disclosure requirement about the income earned is issued by the Income Tax Department.

Moving on, if cryptocurrency is considered as 'currency', it would not be susceptible to tax under the IT Act.

  • The first reason being, under the Act, the definition of 'income' is an inclusive one, which comprises not only the 'natural' meaning but also the items mentioned under Sec 2(24) of the IT Act. But neither the natural meaning nor Sec 2(24) of the IT Act includes 'money' or 'currency' as income, although it includes 'monetary payment'.
  • Secondly, being a mode of consideration, the tax incidence would be on the transaction and not on the currency. On the other hand, if cryptocurrency is considered as goods/property, then clearly it would be either covered within the charging provision of 'Profit and Gains from Business and Profession' or 'Income from Capital Gains', depending upon its use for business/profession or not. It would not be out of place to state that the ambit of the word 'income' is not restricted to the words 'profits' and 'gains' and anything which can appropriately be designated as 'income' is liable to be taxed under the IT Act, unless expressly exempted.

Treatment under the head 'Capital Gains'

Sec 2(14) of the IT Act defines a capital asset as "property of any kind held by the assessee whether or not connected with his business or profession".  This definition of 'capital asset' provided is widest in itself and covers all kinds of property except those expressly excluded under the Act.0 Therefore, any gains arising out of the transfer of cryptocurrency must be considered as capital gains, if they are held for investment.

Taxability under 'Profit and Gains from Business and Profession'

The tax treatment of cryptocurrencies when held as 'stock in trade' is not the one which faces major difficulties as the issues arising while treating it as capital gains do not arise when such cryptocurrencies are held in furtherance of business activity. Under Sec 2(13) of the IT Act, the definition of 'business' is inclusive, and comprises of "trade, commerce or manufacture or any adventure or concern of such nature." Moreover, any continuous activity like trade in cryptocurrencies is included within this definition, and profits realized are taxable thereunder, chargeable under Sec 28 of the IT Act.

The profits may not necessarily be in the form of money, they are taxable even if they are 'in-kind'. Any expenditure incurred for this purpose, such as the purchase of computing power as a capital asset, should be allowable as a deduction per the provisions specified in Sec 30 to Sec 43D of the IT Act.

India Cryptocurrency Taxation under Indirect Tax Regime

The treatment of cryptocurrency as goods/property implies that the supply of bitcoins is a 'taxable supply' and hence subject to GST. Technically, a supply of cryptocurrency as goods or property in exchange for other virtual/real goods should fall within the ambit of 'barter transaction' since bartering is simply an exchange of one good for another.

Even in its most innovative form, any barter transaction has two essentials -

  1. Direct exchange of goods or services for other goods/services and
  2. No use of money

    Before GST,  under the various state VAT laws, the incidence of tax arose when there was a sale of goods in exchange for cash, deferred payment, or any other valuable consideration. The expression 'any other valuable consideration' leaves out a wide scope of ambiguity, since the term should typically derive reference, ejusdem generis, from its preceding terms (i.e. cash and deferred payment), and therefore, must not include an exchange of goods for other goods. This view was reiterated by the Supreme Court in the case of Sales Tax Commissioner v. Ram Kumar Agarwal, where a transaction of gold bullions in exchange for ornaments was excluded from the definition of sale under Sec 2(h) of the Sale of Goods Act, 1930. However, the position is similar to when a transaction is used as a device to conceal monetary consideration, courts may unravel the device to include it within the ambit of sale.

    An approach where cryptocurrencies are considered as goods means that some transactions would be taxed twice - at first on supply (otherwise exempted for a transaction in money) and secondly on consideration, unnecessarily leading to higher tax. This higher incidence of taxation puts the businesses operating in cryptocurrencies at a huge disadvantage which also diminishes their purchasing capacity. The issue gets further complicated in cases of international transactions.

CONCLUSION

The crypto in today's scenario has the potential to boost the backbone of India's digital infrastructure and also securing all the transactions made on the digital network. In this situation levying taxes on the transactions involving cryptocurrency should be considered a welcoming move and should not be seen as a restriction. It is a two way street for the crypto transactions to be traced and used legally as well as generating income for the government to be used efficiently. It is also vehemently asserted that employing tax on crypto as a policy matter can help to provide an ideal atmosphere to assure the traders that their money is safe and the risks involved in trading are also mitigated.

DISCLAIMER